A Ranker World of Comedy Opinion Graph: Who Connects the Funny Universe?

In the previous post, we showed how a Gephi layout algorithm was able to capture different domains in the world of comedy across all of the Ranker lists tagged with the word “funny”.  However, these algorithms also give us information about the roles that individuals play within clusters. The size of the node indicates that node’s ability to connect other nodes, so bigger nodes indicate individuals who serve as a gateway between different nodes and categories.  These are the nodes that you would want to target if you wanted to reach the broadest audience, as people who like these comedic individuals also like many others.  Sort of like having that one friend who knows everyone send out the event invite instead of having to send it to a smaller group of friends in your own social network and hoping it gets around. So who connects the comedic universe?

The short answer: Dave Chappelle (click to enlarge)

Chappelle

Dave Chappelle is the superconnector. He has both the largest number of direct connections and the largest number of overall connections. If you want to reach the most people, go to him. If you want to connect people between different kinds of comedy, go to him.  He is the center of the comedic universe. He’s not the only one with connections though.

Top 10 Overall Connectors

  1. Dave Chappelle 
  2. Eddie Izzard 
  3. John Cleese 
  4. Ricky Gervais
  5. Rowan Atkinson
  6. Eric Idle
  7. Billy Connolly
  8. Bill Hicks
  9. It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia
  10. Sarah Silverman

 

We can also look at who the biggest connectors are between different comedy domains.

  • Contemporary TV Shows: It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, ALF, and The Daily Show are the strongest connectors. They provide bridges to all 6 other comedy domains.
  • Contemporary Comedians on American Television: Dave Chappelle, Eddie Izzard and Ricky Gervais are the strongest connectors. They provide bridges to all 6 other comedy domains.
  •  Classic Comedians: John Cleese and Eric Idle are the strongest connectors. They provide bridges to all 6 other comedy domains.
  • Classic TV Shows: The Muppet Show and Monty Python’s Flying Circus are the strongest connectors. They provide bridges to Classic TV Comedians, Animated TV shows, and Classic Comedy Movies.
  • British Comedians: Rowan Atkinson is the strongest connector. He serves as a bridge to all of the other 6 comedy domains.
  • Animated TV Shows: South Park is the strongest connector. It serves as a bridge to Classic Comedians, Classic TV Shows, and British Comedians.
  • Classic Comedy Movies: None of the nodes in this domain were strong connectors to other domains, though National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation was the strongest node in this network.

 

 

A Ranker Opinion Graph of the Domains of the World of Comedy

One unique aspect of Ranker data is that people rank a wide variety of lists, allowing us to look at connections beyond the scope of any individual topic.  We compiled data from all of the lists on Ranker with the word “funny” to get a bigger picture of the interconnected world of comedy.  Using Gephi layout algorithms, we were able to create an Opinion Graph which categorizes comedy domains and identify points of intersection between them (click to make larger).

all3sm

In the following graphs, colors indicate different comedic categories that emerged from a cluster analysis, and the connecting lines indicate correlations between different nodes with thicker lines indicating stronger relationships.  Circles (or nodes) that are closest together are most similar.  The classification algorithm produced 7 comedy domains:

 

CurrentTVwAmerican TV Shows and Characters: 26% of comedy, central nodes =  It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, ALF, The Daily Show, Chappelle’s Show, and Friends.

NowComedianwContemporary Comedians on American Television: 25% of nodes, includes Dave Chappelle, Eddie Izzard, Ricky Gervais, Billy Connolly, and Bill Hicks.

 

ClassicComedianswClassic Comedians: 15% of comedy, central nodes = John Cleese, Eric Idle, Michael Palin, Charlie Chaplin, and George Carlin.

ClassicTVClassic TV Shows and Characters: 14% of comedy, central nodes = The Muppet Show, Monty Python’s Flying Circus, In Living Color, WKRP in Cincinnati, and The Carol Burnett Show.

BritComwBritish Comedians: 9% of comedy, central nodes = Rowan Atkinson, Jennifer Saunders, Stephen Fry, Hugh Laurie, and Dawn French.

AnimwAnimated TV Shows and Characters: 9% of comedy, central nodes = South Park, Family Guy, Futurama, The Simpsons, and Moe Szyslak.

MovieswClassic Comedy Movies: 1.5% of comedy, central nodes = National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation, Ghostbusters, Airplane!, Vacation, and Caddyshack.

 

 

Clusters that are the most similar (most overlap/closest together):

  • Classic TV Shows and Contemporary TV Shows
  • British Comedians and Classic TV shows
  • British Comedians and Contemporary Comedians on American Television
  • Animated TV Shows and Contemporary TV Shows

Clusters that are the most distinct (lest overlap/furthest apart):

  • Classic Comedy Movies do not overlap with any other comedy domains
  • Animated TV Shows and British Comedians
  • Contemporary Comedians on American Television and Classic TV Shows

 

Take a look at our follow-up post on the individuals who connect the comedic universe.

– Kate Johnson

 

Changes in Opinion for House of Cards, The Walking Dead, Mad Men, & Workaholics

One of the coolest things about Ranker is the fact that Ranker votes are recorded in real time as they happen, allowing the potential for it to track changes in people’s opinions. A list like, “The Best Shows Currently on Air” generates heavy traffic due to the popularity of television shows on air and online. A certain television show can amass an impressive, almost cult-like, following and it’s interesting to see how public opinions change over time, why, and if it corresponds to changes happening in the real-world.

The figure below shows the pattern of change in the proportion of up-votes for the TV shows in this list, and highlights four shows: House of Cards, The Walking Dead, Mad Men, and Workaholics.

tv_show_house_of_cards_change

There is a steep decline in the proportion of up votes in December of 2013 for the House of Cards. Interestingly, this was during an interim period between seasons where seemingly nothing significant relating to the show was occurring. A plausible explanation could be due to a ceiling effect as there were few up votes and no down votes until that time. When a show first gets on a Ranker list, it often is only voted on by the fans of that show. As the show is only accessible through Netflix, the viewing audience is significantly smaller than cable or network Television shows, so that may further skew the number of people who knew enough about the show to consider downvoting it. Fascinatingly enough, in the same month, during a televised meeting with tech industry CEOs on NSA surveillance, President Obama expressed his love for the show stating “I wish things were that ruthlessly efficient,” adding that Rep. Frank Underwood, played by Kevin Spacey, “is getting a lot of stuff done”. Could the increase in downvotes be due to certain members of the public expressing their opinions about the President through the voting patterns on The House of Cards on Ranker?
The entire second season of The House of Cards was released on February 14th on Netflix in the same binge-watching format as the first season, which garnered positive reviews. Interestingly, there is a significant decline in proportion of up votes for The House of Cards from February 2014 to April 2014, however viewership of season two was much higher than season one based on early reviews. The show also garnered critical acclaim for season two earning thirteen Primetime Emmy Award nominations for the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards, and three nominations at both the 72nd Golden Globe Awards and the 21st Screen Actors Guild Awards. Given the viewership ratings and critical success, it may seem surprising to see such a steep drop in votes. But in looking at Ranker data, it is often common for shows to get more downvotes over time as they get better known, as people rarely downvote things they haven’t heard of, even as a show also receives more upvotes. This is why our algorithms take into account both the volume and proportion of upvotes vs. downvotes.
Shows that are more readily accessible may exhibit less of a ceiling effect early on, as there is a greater likelihood of people watching the show who aren’t specifically looking for it. Looking at Mad Men and The Walking Dead, there is a steady increase in up-vote proportion over the span that votes were submitted from June 2013 to last month, April 2015. The Walking Dead is the most watched drama series telecast in basic cable history, making it reasonable to assume that the reason for the continual increases are due to the increasing number of fans of the show who vote for it as the “Best Show Currently on Air”. Mad Men fans had similar voting patterns.

For a show like Workaholic, which airs on Comedy Central, there is a significantly smaller viewing audience compared to national networks, and they do not have the fanbase power of House of Cards or The Walking Dead. However, it is a show with positive reviews and a steady following of loyal fans. Though it is not as popular as other shows airing, it’s proven to be a show with comedic talent that generates positive sentiments amongst its viewers and a growing proportion of up-votes.
While these examples are only suggestive, the enormous number of votes made by Ranker uses, and the variety of topics they cover, makes the possibility of measuring opinions, and detecting and understanding change in opinions, an intriguing one that is worth continuing to expand upon.
-Emily Liu

by    in Data Science, Pop Culture, prediction

Ranker Predicts Spurs to beat Cavaliers for 2015 NBA Championship

The NBA Season starts tonight and building on the proven success of our World Cup and movie box office predictions, as well as the preliminary success of our NFL predictions, Ranker is happy to announce our 2015 NBA Championship Predictions, based upon the aggregated data from basketball fans who have weighed in on our NBA and basketball lists.

Ranker's 2015 NBA Championship Predictions as Compared to ESPN and FiveThirtyEight
Ranker’s 2015 NBA Championship Predictions as Compared to ESPN and FiveThirtyEight

For comparison’s sake, I included the current ESPN power rankings as well as FiveThirtyEight’s teams that have the most percentage chance of winning the championship.  As with any sporting event, chance will play a large role in the outcome, but the premise of producing our predictions regularly is to validate our belief that the aggregated opinions of many will generally outperform expert opinions (ESPN) or models based on non-opinion data (e.g. player performance data plays a large role in FiveThirtyEight’s predictions).  Our ultimate goal is to prove the utility of crowdsourced data, as while something like NBA predictions is a crowded space where many people attempt to answer this question, Ranker produces the world’s only significant data model for equally important questions, such as determining the world’s best DJseveryone’s biggest turn-ons or the best cheeses for a grilled cheese sandwich.

– Ravi Iyer

by    in Data Science, Pop Culture, prediction

Comparing World Cup Prediction Algorithms – Ranker vs. FiveThirtyEight

Like most Americans, I pay attention to soccer/football once every four years.  But I think about prediction almost daily and so this year’s World Cup will be especially interesting to me as I have a dog in this fight.  Specifically, UC-Irvine Professor Michael Lee put together a prediction model based on the combined wisdom of Ranker users who voted on our Who will win the 2014 World Cup list, plus the structure of the tournament itself.  The methodology runs in contrast to the FiveThirtyEight model, which uses entirely different data (national team results plus the results of players who will be playing for the national team in league play) to make predictions.  As such, the battle lines are clearly drawn.  Will the Wisdom of Crowds outperform algorithmic analyses based on match results?  Or a better way of putting it might be that this is a test of whether human beings notice things that aren’t picked up in the box scores and statistics that form the core of FiveThirtyEight’s predictions or sabermetrics.

So who will I be rooting for?  Both methodologies agree that Brazil, Germany, Argentina, and Spain are the teams to beat.  But the crowds believe that those four teams are relatively evenly matched while the FiveThirtyEight statistical model puts Brazil as having a 45% chance to win.  After those first four, the models diverge quite a bit with the crowd picking the Netherlands, Italy, and Portugal amongst the next few (both models agree on Colombia), while the FiveThirtyEight model picks Chile, France, and Uruguay.  Accordingly, I’ll be rooting for the Netherlands, Italy, and Portugal and against Chile, France, and Uruguay.

In truth, the best model would combine the signal from both methodologies, similar to how the Netflix prize was won or how baseball teams combine scout and sabermetric opinions.  I’m pretty sure that Nate Silver would agree that his model would be improved by adding our data (or similar data from betting markets like Betfair that similarly thought that FiveThirtyEight was underrating Italy and Portugal) and vice versa.  Still, even as I know that chance will play a big part in the outcome, I’m hoping Ranker data wins in this year’s world cup.

– Ravi Iyer

Ranker’s Pre-Tournament Predictions:

FiveThirtyEight’s Pre-Tournament Predictions:

Can Colbert bring young Breaking Bad Fans to The Late Show?

I have to admit that I thought it was a joke at first when I heard the news that Stephen Colbert is leaving The Colbert Report and is going to host the Late Show, currently hosted by David Letterman.  The fact that he won’t be “in character” in the new show makes it more intriguing, even as it brings tremendous change to my entertainment universe.  However, while it will take some getting used to, looking at Ranker data on the two shows reveals how the change really does make sense for CBS.

Despite the ire of those who disagree with The Colbert Report’s politics, CBS is definitely addressing a need to compete better for younger viewers, who are less likely to watch TV on the major networks.  Ranker users tend to be in the 18-35 year old age bracket and The Colbert Report ranks higher than the Late Show on most every list that they both are on including the Funniest TV shows of 2012 (19 vs. 28), Best TV Shows of All-Time (186 vs. 197), and Best TV Shows of Recent Memory (37 vs. 166).  Further, people who tend to like The Colbert Report also seem to like many of the most popular shows around like Breaking Bad, Mad Men, Game of Thrones, and 30 Rock.  In contrast, correlates of the Late Show include older shows like The Sopranos and 60 Minutes.  There is some overlap as fans of both shows like The West Wing and The Daily Show, indicating that Colbert may be able to appeal to current fans as well as new audiences.

Colbert Can Expand Late Show's Audience to New Groups, yet Retain Many Current Fans.

I’ll be sad to see “Stephen Colbert” the character go.  But it looks like my loss is CBS’ gain.

– Ravi Iyer

by    in About Ranker, Opinion Graph, Pop Culture, Rankings

Ranker’s Rankings API Now in Beta

Increasingly, people are looking for specific answers to questions as opposed to webpages that happen to match the text they type into a search engine.  For example, if you search for the capital of France or the birthdate of Leonardo Da Vinci, you get a specific answer.  However, the questions that people ask are increasingly about opinions, not facts, as people are understandably more interested in what the best movie of 2013 was, as opposed to who the producer for Star Trek: Into Darkness was.

Enter Ranker’s Rankings API, which is currently now in beta, as we’d love the input of potential users’ of our API to help improve it.  Our API returns aggregated opinions about specific movies, people, tv shows, places, etc.  As an input, we can take a Wikipedia, Freebase, or Ranker ID.  For example, below is a request for information about Tom Cruise, using his Ranker ID from his Ranker page (contact us if you want to use other IDs to access).
http://api.ranker.com/rankings/?ids=2257588&type=RANKER

In the response to this request, you’ll get a set of Rankings for the requested object, including a set of list names (e.g. “listName”:”The Greatest 80s Teen Stars”), list urls (e.g. “listUrl”:”http://www.ranker.com/crowdranked-list/45-greatest-80_s-teen-stars” – note that the domain, www.ranker.com, is implied), item names (e.g. “itemName”:”Tom Cruise”) position of the item on this list (e.g. “position”:21), number of items on the list (e.g. “numItemsOnList”:70), the number of people who have voted on this list (e.g. “numVoters”:1149), the number of positive votes for this item (e.g. “numUpVotes”:245) vs. the number of negative votes (e.g. “numDownVotes”:169), and the Ranker list id (e.g. “listId”:584305).  Note that results are cached so they may not match the current page exactly.

Here is a snipped of the response for Tom Cruise.

[ { “itemName” : “Tom Cruise”,
“listId” : 346881,
“listName” : “The Greatest Film Actors & Actresses of All Time”,
“listUrl” : “http://www.ranker.com/crowdranked-list/the-greatest-film-actors-and-actresses-of-all-time”,
“numDownVotes” : 306,
“numItemsOnList” : 524,
“numUpVotes” : 285,
“numVoters” : 5305,
“position” : 85
},
{ “itemName” : “Tom Cruise”,
“listId” : 542455,
“listName” : “The Hottest Male Celebrities”,
“listUrl” : “http://www.ranker.com/crowdranked-list/hottest-male-celebrities”,
“numDownVotes” : 175,
“numItemsOnList” : 171,
“numUpVotes” : 86,
“numVoters” : 1937,
“position” : 63
},
{ “itemName” : “Tom Cruise”,
“listId” : 679173,
“listName” : “The Best Actors in Film History”,
“listUrl” : “http://www.ranker.com/crowdranked-list/best-actors”,
“numDownVotes” : 151,
“numItemsOnList” : 272,
“numUpVotes” : 124,
“numVoters” : 1507,
“position” : 102
}

…CLIPPED….
]

What can you do with this API?  Consider this page about Tom Cruise from Google’s Knowledge Graph.  It tells you his children, his spouse(s), and his movies.  But our API will tell you that he is one of the hottest male celebrities, an annoying A-List actor, an action star, a short actor, and an 80s teen star.  His name comes up in discussions of great actors, but he tends to get more downvotes than upvotes on such lists, and even shows up on lists of “overrated” actors.

We can provide this information, not just about actors, but also about politicians, books, places, movies, tv shows, bands, athletes, colleges, brands, food, beer, and more.  We will tend to have more information about entertainment related categories, for now, but as the domains of our lists grow, so too will the breadth of opinion related information available from our API.

Our API is free and no registration is required, though we would request that you provide links and attributions to the Ranker lists that provide this data.  We likely will add some free registration at some point.  There are currently no formal rate limits, though there are obviously practical limits so please contact us if you plan to use the API heavily as we may need to make changes to accommodate such usage.  Please do let me know (ravi a t ranker) your experiences with our API and any suggestions for improvements as we are definitely looking to improve upon our beta offering.

– Ravi Iyer

by    in interest graph, Market Research, Pop Culture

Hierarchical Clustering of a Ranker list of Beers

This is a guest post by Markus Pudenz.

Ranker is currently exploring ways to visualize the millions of votes collected on various topics each month.  I’ve recently begun using hierarchical cluster analysis to produce taxonomies (also known as dendograms), and applied these techniques to Ranker’s Best Beers from Around the World. A dendrogram allows one to visualize the relationships on voting patterns (scroll down to see what a dendrogram looks like). What hierarchical clustering does is break down the list into related groups based on voting patterns of the users, grouping like items with items that were voted similarly by the same users. The algorithm is agglomerative, meaning it is starts with individual items and combines them iteratively until one large cluster (all of the beers in the list)  remains.

Every beer in our dendrogram is related to another at some level, whether in the original cluster or further down the dendrogram. See the height axis on the left side? The lower the cluster is on the axis, the closer the relationship the beers will have. For example, the cluster containing Guinness and Guinness Original is the lowest in this dendrogram indicating these to beers have the closest relationship based on the voting patterns. Regarding our list, voters have the option to Vote Up or Vote Down any beer they want. Let’s start at the top of the dendrogram and work our way down.

Hierarchical Clustering of Beer Preferences

Looking at the first split of the clusters, one can observe the cluster on the right contains beers that would generally be considered well-known including Guinness, Sam Adams, Heineken and Corona. In fact, the cluster on the right includes seven of the top ten beers from the list. The fact that most of our popular beers are in this right cluster indicates that there is a strong order effect with voters more likely to select beers that are more popular when ranking their favorite beers. For example, if someone selects a beer that is in the top ten, then another beer they select is also more likely to be in the top ten. As we examine the right cluster further, the first split divides the cluster into two smaller clusters. In the left cluster, we can clearly see, unsurprisingly, that a drinker who likes Guinness is more likely to vote for another variety of Guinness. This left cluster is comprised almost entirely of Guinness varieties with the exception of Murphy’s Irish Stout. The right cluster lists a larger variety of beer makers including Sam Adams, Stella Artois and Pyramid. In addition, none of the beers in this right cluster are stouts as with the left cluster. The only brewer in this right cluster with multiple varieties is Sam Adams with Boston Lager and Octoberfest meaning drinkers in this cluster were not as brand loyal as in the left cluster. Drinkers in this cluster were more likely to select a beer variety from a different brewer. When reviewing this cluster from the first split in the dendrogram, there is clearly a defined split between those drinkers who prefer a heavier beer (stout) as opposed to those who prefer lighter beers like lagers, pilseners, pale ales or hefeweizen.

Conversely, for beers in the left cluster, drinkers are more likely to vote for other beers that are not as popular with only three of the top ten beers in this cluster. In addition, because of the larger size, the range of beer styles and brewers for this cluster is more varied as opposed to those in the right cluster. The left cluster splits into three smaller clusters before splitting further. One cluster that is clearly distinct is the second of these clusters. This cluster is comprised almost entirely of Belgian style beers with the only exception being Pliny the Elder, an IPA. La Fin du Monde is a Belgian style tripel from Quebec with the remaining brewers from Belgium. One split within this cluster is comprised entirely of beer varieties from Chimay indicating a strong relationship; voters who select Chimay are more likely to also select a different style from Chimay when ranking their favorites.  Our remaining clusters have a little more variety. Our first cluster, the smallest of the three, has a strong representation from California with varieties from Stone, Sierra Nevada and Anchor Steam taking four out of six nodes in the cluster. Stone IPA and Stone Arrogant Bastard Ale have the strongest relationship in this cluster. Our third cluster, the largest of the three, has even more variety than the first. We see a strong relationship especially with Hoegaarden and Leffe.

I was also curious as to whether the beers in the top ten were associated with larger or smaller breweries. As the following list shows,  there is an even split between the larger conglomerates like AB InBev, Diageo, Miller Coors and independent breweries like New Belgium and Sierra Nevada.

  1. Guinness (Diageo)
  2. Newcastle (Heineken)
  3. Sam Adams Boston Lager (Boston Beer Company)
  4. Stella Artois (AB InBev)
  5. Fat Tire (New Belgium Brewing Company)
  6. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale (Sierra Nevada Brewing Company)
  7. Blue Moon (Miller Coors)
  8. Stone IPA (Stone Brewing Company)
  9. Guinness Original (Diageo)
  10. Hoegaarden Witbier (AB InBev)

Markus Pudenz

by    in Opinion Graph, Pop Culture, Rankings

Examining Regional Voting Differences with Ranker’s Polling Widget

Ranker has a new program where we offer a polling widget to partner sites who want the engagement of a poll in list format (as opposed to the standard radio button poll).  Currently, sites that use our poll (e.g. TheNextWeb or CBC) are seeing 20-50% of visitors engaging in the poll and an increase in returning visitors who want to keep track of results.  We also give partners prominent placement on Ranker.com (details of that here), but a benefit that is less obvious is the potential insights from one’s users that one can gain from the data behind a poll.  To illustrate what is possible, I’m going to use data from one of our regular widget users, Phish.net, who posted this poll on Phish’s best summer concert jams.

One piece of data that Ranker can give partners is a regional breakdown of voters.  Unsuprisingly, there were strong regional differences in voting behavior with voters from the northeast often choosing a jam from their New Jersey show, voters from the west coast often choosing a jam from their Hollywood Bowl show, voters from the south often choosing a jam from their Maryland show, voters from the midwest often choosing a jam from their Chicago show, and voters from the mountain region often choosing a jam from their show at The Gorge.  However, the interesting thing to me was that the leading jam in every region was Tweezer – Lake Tahoe from July 31st.  As someone who believes that better crowdsourced answers are produced by aggregating across bias and who has only been to 1 Phish concert, I’m definitely going to have to check out this jam.  Perhaps the answer is obvious to more experienced Phish fans, but the results of the poll are certainly instructive to the more casual music fan who wants a taste of Phish.

Below are the results of the poll in graphical format.  Notice how the shows cluster based on venue and geography except for Tweezer – Lake Tahoe which is directly in the center of the graph.

If you’re interested in running a widget poll on your site, the benefits are more clearly spelled out here and you can email us at “widget at ranker.com”.  We’d love to provide similar region based insights for your polls as well.

– Ravi Iyer

 

Why We Still Play Board Games: An Opinion Graph Analysis

It’s hard reading studies about people my age when research scientists haven’t agreed upon a term for us yet. In one study I’m a member of “Gen Y” (lazy), in another I’m from the “iGeneration” (Orwellian), or worse still, a “Millennial” (…no). You beleaguered and cynical 30-somethings had things easy with the “Generation X” thing. Let the record reflect that no one from my generation is even remotely okay with any of these terms. Furthermore, we all collectively check out whenever we hear the term “aughties”.

I’m whining about the nomenclature only because there’s a clear need for distinction between my generation and those who have/will come before/after us. This isn’t just from a cultural standpoint (although calling us “Generation Spongebob” might be the most ubiquitous touchstone you could get), but from a technical one. If this Kaiser Family Foundation study is to be believed (via NYT), 8-18 year olds today are the first to spend the majority of their waking hours interacting with the internet.

Yet despite this monumental change, there are still many childhood staples that have not been forsaken by an increasingly digital generation. One of the most compelling examples of this anomaly lies in board games. In a day and age where Apple is selling two billion apps a month (Apple), companies peddling games for our increasingly elusive away-from-keyboard time are still holding their own. For example, Hasbro’s board-and-card game based revenue grew to $1.19b dollars over the course of the last fiscal year (a 2% gain from last year).

What drove this growth? Hasbro’s earnings reports primarily accredits this growth to three products: Magic: The Gathering, Twister, and Battleship. All of these products have been mainstays of their line-up for quite some time (prepare to feel old: if Magic: The Gathering was a child, it could buy booze this year), so what’s compelling people to keep buying? Fortunately, Ranker has some pretty in-depth data on all of these products, based on people who vote on it’s best board games list, which receives thousands of opinions each month, as well as voting on other Ranker lists.

Twister’s continuous sales were the easiest to explain: users who expressed interest in the game were most likely to be a fan of other board games (Candy Land, Chutes and Ladders, Monopoly and so forth). Twister also correlated with many other programs/products with fairly universal appeal (Friends, Gremlins). This would seem to indicate that the chief reason for Twister’s continued high sales lies in its simplicity and ubiquity. The game is a cultural touchstone for that reason: more than any other game on the list, it’s the one hardest to picture a childhood without.

Battleship’s success lies in the same roots: our data shows great overlap between fans of the game and fans of Mouse Trap, Monopoly, etc. But Battleship has attracted fans of a different stripe, interest in films such as Doom, Independence Day, and Terminator were highly correlated with the game. In all likelihood, this is due to the recent silver-screen adaptation of the game. Although the movie only faired modestly within the United States, the film clearly did propel the game back into the public consciousness, which translated nicely into sales.

Finally, Magic: The Gathering’s success came from support of another nature. Interest in Magic correlated primarily with other role-play and strategy games (Settlers of Catan, Dominion, Heroscape). Simply put, most fans of Magic are likely to enjoy other traditionally “nerdy” games. The large correlation overlap between Magic and other role-playing games is a testament to how voraciously this group consumes these products.

The crowd-sourced information we have here neatly divides the consumers of each game into three pools. With this sort of individualized knowledge, targeting and marketing to each archetype of consumer is a far easier task.

– Eamon Levesque

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